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Old 02-02-2005, 08:48 PM   #1
marlene
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Default Making the gradient

It has been decreed that I must use a gradient tint in most of a client's publications. It goes from 100% of a spot color to white. I used a Quark template that was provided to me, but have not seen the printed result yet.

When working in Quark, should I just keep doing the gradients there, or do them in Photoshop, Illustrator, or FreeHand and import them into Quark?

And when the gradient is occurring in a 4-color publication, should I use a process color instead of the spot color, or just let Quark do the conversion?

Any gotchas I should know about?

mxh
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Old 02-03-2005, 06:00 AM   #2
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You should be fine doing them in XPress. Separation from that app has always worked well for my projects with spot gradients and multi-ink colors made with PMSs.

As for 4/c projects, however, you probably already know that not every PMS color translates nicely to CMYK. I would not leave that to any program to convert, I'd say to take the PMS and find the best CMYK equivalent you can, then use that to make the gradient.

I've gone through a lot of fuss with clients until I could make them understand that not all of their colors could be faithfully reproduced in CMYK. Once they understood that -- and could see printed samples proving my point -- they were OK with it. Disappointed, but OK and no longer blaming me. <g> What most helped them understand was getting their own copy of the Pantone spot-to-process (or whatever it's called) fan guide that I told them to get. Once the main guy got it and understood what I was explaining, he ordered all their offices to get the guides.

   
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Old 02-03-2005, 08:42 AM   #3
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I've already beaten my clients over the head with the spot-to-process 2x4. I think some of them just pretend to understand, to get me to shut up already. <g>

In this case, the spot color seems to separate pretty closely to the nearest match in the Pantone process guide, so I think it'll be okay. I'll find out in a few days when I see the printed copies.

But in the future I'll probably use the process color in the gradient just to be sure. I do remember a disaster a few years ago -- I had send out an ad (containing a spot color gradient) to be placed in a 4-color magazine in PDF format. Something went terribly wrong and my nice bright green became olive drab. I suspect that if I had supplied a process gradient, it might not have happened, although I had sent the same spot gradient ad to other publications who printed it in the correct color.

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Old 02-15-2005, 04:03 PM   #4
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don't go to "white"

that can force the job into process color space

go from 100 PMS to 0 PMS.

that will keep it in spot color space.

   
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Old 02-15-2005, 04:17 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mact
don't go to "white"

that can force the job into process color space

go from 100 PMS to 0 PMS.

that will keep it in spot color space.
Ah, very very good tip. Yes, I've been bitten by that, but it's been so long that I'd forgotten that very important detail.

   
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Old 02-16-2005, 04:17 PM   #6
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Quote:
go from 100 PMS to 0 PMS.
Good tip! I'd forgotten about the old "zero percent of a color instead of 100 percent of white" trick.

Thanks, Mac!
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Old 02-16-2005, 05:13 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marlene
I'd forgotten about the old "zero percent of a color instead of 100 percent of white" trick.
Safer is to go to 0.01% of the color--nothing will actually hold that dot, so it functionally equivalent to a 0%dot, but I remember some apps converting 0% of anything to white--which forced the gradient into cmyk space.

   
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Old 02-16-2005, 08:09 PM   #8
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Quark will let me do tenths of a percent, but not hundredths... I wonder if .1% of the color would work?

And I can't remember how to do a gradient in Photoshop! I've done it, but not in a very long time.

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